Tag Archives: Academic salaries

Union clash looms as employers’ pension plans revealed

Union clash looms as employers’ pension plans revealed | Jack Grove | Times Higher Education | 24 July 2014

Universities are set on a collision course with unions after confirming that they want to scrap final salary pensions offered by the sector’s biggest scheme to reduce an estimated £13 billion deficit.

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Salaries of high-earning professors may be disclosed

Salaries of high-earning professors may be disclosed | Jack GroveI | Times Higher Education | 10 July 2014

alaries of high-earning professors and senior managers may soon be made public after a landmark ruling said that a university must publish details of staff who earn more than £100,000 a year.

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Professorial pay rises twice as fast as rest

Professorial pay rises twice as fast as rest | Jack Grove | Times Higher Education | 28 March 2013

Professorial salaries are rising more than twice as fast as pay for other academic grades, raising fears about the inflationary impact of next year’s research excellence framework.

With just seven months to go until the cut-off point for inclusion of staff in the REF, figures released by the Higher Education Statistics Agency suggest that professorial staff are gaining higher wage rises than rank-and-file academics squeezed by low national pay offers.

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Presidential Pay Remains a Potent Political Target

Presidential Pay Remains a Potent Political Target | Jack Stripling & Andrea Fuller | Chronicle of Higher Education | 25 May, 2012

The article discusses the salaries of public university presidents, focusing on the topic’s use in political discourse in the U.S. and offering a case study of the University of California system (Cal State). The author looks at criticism leveled against the University of Minnesota regarding million dollar executive compensations known as golden parachutes, the stagnation of Cal State’s faculty salaries, as well as comments by F. King Alexander of Cal State at Long Beach.

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College’s Cost Isn’t Due to Jumps in Pay, AAUP Says

College’s Cost Isn’t Due to Jumps in Pay, AAUP Says | Audrey Williams June | Chronicle of Higher Education | 08 April, 2o12

The article discusses a report entitled “A Very Slow Recovery,” by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) that seeks to show that professors’ salaries are not the reason behind increasing costs of college. It examines the idea that professors are overpaid, considering full-time and adjunct professors’ salaries.

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Local pay rates up with the best

Local pay rates up with the best | Julie Hare | The Australian Higher Education | 11 April, 2012

AUSTRALIA’S academics are among the best paid in the world, but they need to move to Canada if they want to maximise their pay packet. Australia is eighth on a list of 28 countries studied for a comparison of academic remuneration and contracts by US higher education expert Philip Altbach and colleagues. His findings are contained in a book Paying the Professoriate published last week.

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Academic salaries no longer attract top talent, survey finds

Academic salaries no longer attract top talent, survey finds | Jack Grove | Times Higher Education | 22 March 2012

Scholars’ remuneration packages fail to match pay in many other professions. Academic salaries are no longer sufficient to attract the brightest and best into the sector, according to the co-author of a new global survey of higher education pay.

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Faculty Experience Doesn’t Always Pay

Faculty Experience Doesn’t Always Pay | Audrey Williams June | Chronicle of Higher Education | 15 April, 2011

The article discusses “It’s Not Over Yet,” an annual study completed by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) regarding college teacher salaries in the U.S in 2010-2011. It examines how the U.S. economic recession is having an impact on pay raises for experienced faculty members, discusses the concepts of salary compression, and presents comments from AAUP officers Saranna R. Thornton and John W. Curtis.

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