Monthly Archives: March 2011

Hepi calls for alumni to take governance roles

Hepi calls for alumni to take governance roles | Simon Baker | Times Higher Education | 31 March 2011

University governance must be overhauled to address the problem of “dispassionate” independent board members who protect their own interests at times of crisis rather than those of the institutions they serve, according to a new study.

Under changes proposed by the review, alumni would be handed a central role as government reforms necessitate a move towards governors that have a direct interest in their universities’ well-being.

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Curtin University may decide IELTS is too risky

Curtin University may decide IELTS is too risky | Bernard Lane | The Australian | 30 March , 2011

CURTIN University may give up the International English Language Testing System business as too risky, vice-chancellor Jeanette Hacket says. Yesterday, Professor Hacket was one of the last witnesses to appear before West Australian anti-corruption hearings into IELTS fraud at Curtin’s test centre.

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Little-Known Colleges Exploit Visa Loopholes to Make Millions Off Foreign Students

Little-Known Colleges Exploit Visa Loopholes to Make Millions Off Foreign Students | Tom Bartlett Karin Fischer & Josh Keller | Chronicle of Higher Education | 25 March, 2011

The article discusses foreign college students in the U.S. and examines ways in which non-accredited U.S. higher education institutions such as Tri-Valley University, Herguan University, and the University of Northern Virginia have been accused of exploiting college student visa laws in order to earn profits. It chronicles the closing of Tri-Valley by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and describes how students from India enrolled in these schools were promised jobs as part of their collegiate experience.

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Mooted loans shake-up may benefit private institutions

Mooted loans shake-up may benefit private institutions | Simon Baker | Times Higher Education | 24 March 2011

Government seeks to cap loans costs through closure of loophole. Private colleges may be allowed to drastically increase their enrolment of students in receipt of public loans if they agree to underwrite the cost to the taxpayer. Under a little-known loophole, a relatively large number of private providers can already access student loans without facing a cap on their numbers.

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Soft marking claim needs follow-up

Soft marking claim needs follow-up | Andrew Trounson | The Australian Higher Education | 23 March, 2011

GIGI Foster, the researcher whose analysis of the marking of international students’ work provided for the first time evidence of universities passing their work despite inadequate English-language skills, has urged the sector to engage in further research and not shoot the messenger.

The University of NSW economist wanted more universities to make available student data that she analysed from the business faculties of the University of South Australia and University of Technology, Sydney.

But she was concerned her research made people uncomfortable and might discourage universities from co-operating. She called on the Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations to consider setting up a system in which universities could submit the data for regular analysis.

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For-Profit Colleges Manage Defaults to Mask Problems, Analysis Indicates

For-Profit Colleges Manage Defaults to Mask Problems, Analysis Indicates | Goldie Blumenstyk & Alex Richards | Chronicle of Higher Education | 18 March, 2011

The article discusses data released by the U.S. Department of Education regarding a trial study of loan default rates for students enrolled at for-profit universities in the U.S. It examines reasons why many colleges run by higher education companies such as Corinthian Colleges, ITT Educational Services, and the University of Phoenix have reported large differences in the two-year and three-year default rates of students receiving aid.

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Hefce shows how the axe will be wielded

Hefce shows how the axe will be wielded | Simon Baker| Times Higher Education | 17 March 2011

Challenging settlement’ for 2011-12 apportions nearly £1 billion in cuts. Universities in England have learned how massive reductions in state backing will affect them as funding chiefs announced how they would distribute almost £1 billion in cuts.

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For Gay Students, More Room on Campuses

For Gay Students, More Room on Campuses | Sara Lipka | Chronicle of Higher Education | 11 March, 2011

The article discusses incidents of discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) college students in the U.S. and examines ways in which universities are implementing programs and investing in resources to make their campuses more welcoming for LGBT students. It describes how results from a survey conducted by the Campus Pride advocacy group and the suicides of several gay students in the fall of 2010 have prompted changes to be implemented on several campuses including the University of Rhode Island, North Carolina State University, and North Dakota State University.

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Beware of autocratic regimes bearing gifts: spotlight illuminates dark side of donations

Beware of autocratic regimes bearing gifts: spotlight illuminates dark side of donations | Rebecca Attwood, John Morgan, Simon Baker | Times Higher Education | 10 March 2011

Institutions warned to take care when accepting cash from overseas. “The largest philanthropic gifts in the UK go to education and the number of our donors is rising steadily, so universities must expect to be in the brightest spotlight.”These are the words of Joanna Motion, vice-president of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, and they will ring true for the London School of Economics. It has certainly felt the full glare of media attention in recent weeks as all eyes turned to its links with Libya, culminating in the resignation of its director, Sir Howard Davies, last week

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Three ways to be awarded a masters degree

Three ways to be awarded a masters degree | Julie Hare | The Australian Higher Education | 09 March, 2011

AUSTRALIA’S official system for classifying qualifications is set, for the first time, to contain three kinds of masters degrees. This is the advice to go to education ministers in Adelaide next week, according to John Dawkins, who chairs the council responsible for the Australian Qualifications Framework. AQF level nine would include masters by coursework, masters by research and a new extended masters. Some of these extended masters courses, typically in medical and health fields, would be allowed to use the title “doctor of”, Mr Dawkins told the Higher Education Congress in Sydney on Monday.

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