Monthly Archives: May 2011

Employment data could be used to keep a lid on fees

Employment data could be used to keep a lid on fees | Simon Baker | Times Higher Education | 26 May 2011

Potential release of SLC information may prove a godsend to the coalition.  Academics are seeking access to 20 years’ worth of student loan information that could be used by ministers to stop some universities from charging top-end fees.

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My Uni ready to test in July

My Uni ready to test in July  | Bernard Lane | The Australian Higher Education | 25 May, 2011

THE federal government has yet to decide whether to include private providers on the My University website. HES understands concerns have been raised with the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations about students confusing private higher education courses with those provided by a university.

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Crisis of Confidence Threatens Colleges

Crisis of Confidence Threatens Colleges |Karin Fischer | Chronicle of Higher Education | 20 May, 2011

The article presents results from two surveys conducted by the U.S. think tank Pew Research Center regarding the future of the American higher education system. Respondents of the surveys, which consisted of segments of the American public and groups of college presidents, comment on issues such as increasing college costs, the emergence of competition in international higher education, and educational quality and relevance. Differences between private and public higher education funding and an outline of the college graduation goals of U.S. President Barack Obama are discussed. Comments from several college individuals including college president Nancy L. Zimpher, college professor Paula M. Krebs, and higher education research director Ronald G. Ehrenberg are also presented.

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Fears that Willetts’ hellish week may leave debate in limbo

Fears that Willetts’ hellish week may leave debate in limbo | Simon Baker | Times Higher Education | 19 May 2011

The future of higher education is being put in jeopardy at a time of unprecedented change because coalition politics and “knee-jerk” reactions to policy proposals are stifling debate, vice-chancellors have warned. Their concerns come in the wake of a furore last week over an idea floated by David Willetts, the universities and science minister, who suggested removing number controls for “off-quota” home students who can fund their tuition fees up front.

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Aptitude tests show benefits

Aptitude tests show benefits  | Jill Rowbotham | The Australian Higher Eduction | 18 May, 2011

APTITUDE tests for school-leavers have proven their value as a way into universities for clever students who would have no prospect of making it on their final exam results, a trial has shown. A report on uniTEST, released yesterday by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, concludes the assessment facilitated the admission of students who “otherwise would not have received a place, and that these students performed on par with their counterparts who gained entry through other means, most commonly through Year 12 scores”.

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Faculty at For-Profits Allege Constant Pressure to Keep Students Enrolled

Faculty at For-Profits Allege Constant Pressure to Keep Students Enrolled | Kelly Field | Chronicle of Higher Education | 13 May, 2011

The article presents complaints from faculty members at various U.S. for-profit universities regarding the educational quality of the programs that are provided to students. It focuses on a False Claims Act lawsuit filed by former Kaplan Career Institute professors Victoria G. Gatsiopoulos and Dolores A. Howland-Justice against the school which alleges the administration urged teachers to tolerate instances of cheating and plagiarism, alter the grades of students, and report false student attendance records.

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Deadwood, UK: up to half of courses need cross-subsidy to survive, analysis discovers

Deadwood, UK: up to half of courses need cross-subsidy to survive, analysis discovers | Simon Baker | Times Higher Education |12 May 2011

Surpluses must be invested in vocational subjects to ward off for-profits, study says. At least a third and perhaps up to half of all university courses in the UK are loss-making, and many teaching-led universities have departments with no “meaningful existence” that are being kept afloat by profits from other areas. These are among the findings of an in-depth analysis of university business models by The Parthenon Group, an international consultancy firm, which says that a large number of institutions have “multiple departments” that are financially unsustainable.

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Mostly good news in budget despite tough times

Mostly good news in budget despite tough times  | Julie Hare, Higher education editor | The Australian Higher Education | 11 May, 2011

THE federal government last night delivered on key promises made in 2009 following the release of the Bradley report. As a result the higher education sector will have an additional $7 billion from indexation increases and funding for additional students under the demand-driven system. And a record $9.3bn science and research budget has effectively stemmed outcry from the medical research fraternity, which had been protesting against a rumoured $400 million in cuts, which haven’t eventuated. Indexation and additional student places have resulted in a gain of about $1.7bn during the next four years.

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What Good Do Faculty Unions Do?

What Good Do Faculty Unions Do? | Peter Schmidt | Chronicle of Higher Education | 6 May, 2011

Research sheds little light on quantifiable benefits of collective bargaining. As unions that represent public-college professors have come under attack in state legislatures, the unions’ leaders have fought back without being able to define what, exactly, they stand to lose if their right to collectively bargain goes away.

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Poor English a key diagnosis for failure to make PhD grade

Poor English a key diagnosis for failure to make PhD grade |  Paul Jump | Times Higher Education | 5 May 2011

Admissions standards cited as Derby and others explain doctoral failures. A university with one of the worst PhD completion rates in the UK has admitted that some of its candidates are not suitable for doctoral study – particularly international students who lack an adequate level of written English.

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